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Week 16: Data-driven problems, programming and solutions

Class Task and Information

  • Lesson 01:
      • Learning Objective





    • symbolise, explain and use advanced data processes, including table joins, referential integrity, redundancy reduction and anomaly updating

    • Development of Entities
    • Transactional Tables
    • TRD / ERD
    • Table joins (1-1, 1-M, M-M)
    • Normalisations
    • ONF
    • Data Dictionaries.







  • Lesson 02:
      • Learning Objective





    • Read the following QCAA document:
      • Usability Goals (Pragmatic Goals) QCAA reference materials


        • Preece, Rogers and Sharp (Interaction Design) propose 6 usability goals:
          • Effective: effective to use
          • Efficient: efficient to use
          • Utility: have good utility
          • Learnable: easy to learn
            • Memorable: easy to remember how to use
          • Safe: safe to use

          • Safety is protecting the users from dangerous errors, for example losing all the user’s data or protecting the user’s confidential information. Safety can also refer to how users recover from errors. Safety is a little considered usability goal. An example of designing by safety is not putting the delete button next to the save button. Another example, is providing users various ways to recover from errors, both by reverting to a priority state or progressing the system to the correct state. For example in a word processor, the write can use control-z to correct, back button, or retype to correct mistakes. “What kind of errors can users make and how can they recover from the mistake?”

        • Some other usability goals added by me and classes:
          • Ergonomics: especially for smart-phones, can be used in different environments…
          • Accessibility: can be used by many different people, even people with disabilities.






      synthesise user interface, processing and data components to generate a prototype digital solution
    • appraise
      • the suitability of prescribed and self-determined criteria
      • the reliability, maintainability, sustainability, efficiency, effectiveness and useability of algorithms to draw conclusions and make recommendations
    • appraise and refine user interfaces by
      • testing the useability principles, including accessibility, effectiveness, safety, utility and learnability

        Effectiveness is an overall measure of how well the system performs. “Can users use the system to do the work they need to do?”

        Safety is protecting the users from dangerous errors, for example losing all the user’s data or protecting the user’s confidential information. Safety can also refer to how users recover from errors. Safety is a little considered usability goal. An example of designing by safety is not putting the delete button next to the save button. Another example, is providing users various ways to recover from errors, both by reverting to a priority state or progressing the system to the correct state. For example in a word processor, the write can use control-z to correct, back button, or retype to correct mistakes. “What kind of errors can users make and how can they recover from the mistake?”

        Utility is a measure of the correct functionality and breadth of functionality. Most good software is driven by utility, for example word processors have nearly all the features required to compose and format text documents. “Does the system provide all the functionality that users needs?”


      • observing and recording user interactions from user experience critiques
    • justify selection of relevant data from existing data sources
    • evaluate
      • user interfaces from existing solutions using heuristic reviews for the useability principles
      • by testing program modules for reliability, maintainability and efficiency using computational thinking processes such as debugging to refine a prototype digital solution
    • evaluate against prescribed and self-determined criteria the
      • user interface and programmed solutions
      • prototype digital solution.



    • NNg Jakob's Usability Heuristic 1
    • NNg Jakob's Usability Heuristic 2
    • NNg Jakob's Usability Heuristic 3
    • NNg Jakob's Usability Heuristic 4
    • NNg Jakob's Usability Heuristic 5
    • NNg Jakob's Usability Heuristic 6
    • NNg Jakob's Usability Heuristic 7
    • NNg Jakob's Usability Heuristic 8
    • NNg Jakob's Usability Heuristic 9
    • NNg Jakob's Usability Heuristic 10











  • Lesson 03:
      • Learning Objective Review for Topic 1, 2, 3


      • Use traffic lights to identify Green = Know, Orange = Sort of Know, Blue = Cold & Don’t Know
      • Make a list of the items we have not covered


    • Practical discussion: Apply the traffic light system to the following Topic Learning intentions:

      Topic 1: Interactions between users, data and digital systems

      • In this topic, students will:
        • explore and analyse the meaning and importance of innovation and the personal, business and social opportunities presented by innovation
        • recognise and describe components of a digital solution appropriate to the technology context selected

      • server-side components including web server, DBServer and pre-processing components such as PHP
      • client-side components including web browser and user device
      • data components such as database structure
      • internal data structures such as arrays, lists and dictionaries

      • analyse a problem to identify and explain the
        • elements of a system
        • observable interactions
        • inputs and outputs
        • control mechanism
        • processes and interactions using logical diagrams and consistent symbols
      • symbolise and explain
        • useability principles, including accessibility, effectiveness, safety, utility and learnability
        • a variety of interfaces
        • data flow through a system using data flow diagrams
      • symbolise, explain and use advanced data processes, including table joins, referential integrity, redundancy reduction and anomaly updating
      • explore
        • flexible development methods to support a variety of user profiles
        • methods of synthesising user interface, processing and data components to generate a prototype digital solution
      • explore and use the elements and principles of visual communication
        • elements are limited to space, line, colour, shape, texture, tone, form, proportion and scale
        • principles are limited to balance, contrast, proximity, harmony, alignment, repetition and hierarchy
      • determine possible personal, social and economic impacts
      • appraise user interfaces against useability principles

       

      Topic 2: Real-world problems and solution requirements

      • explore programming development tools to understand how to use them effectively
      • analyse problems and information to determine
        • manageable aspects of the problem
        • a specific aspect of the problem to develop
        • boundary or scope of the problem
        • constraints and limitations of the environment
        • requirements of the solution
        • prescribed and self-determined criteria
        • and describe interactions in terms of inputs, processes and outputs
        • and explore data sources (API's and external datasets) to understand relational and flat file data structures
      • generate ideas using innovation and collaboration
      • recognise and compare different file formats and data structures appropriate to the context
      • determine file formats and data structures appropriate to the technology context
      • analyse modularity and readability of program modules
      • recognise and use
        • the basic constructs of an algorithm including assignment, sequence, selection, condition, iteration and modularisation
        • appropriate pseudocode conventions
      • understand that simple algorithms consist of input, process and output
      • symbolise well-ordered and unambiguous algorithms using pseudocode for
        • procedural code that processes data for insertion into a database or manipulates or displays retrieved data
        • user interaction, data validation and data presentation
      • explain code steps using comment syntax appropriate to the programming language
      • apply
        • computational thinking processes, e.g. creating, debugging, persevering and collaborating to identify possible algorithmic approaches
        • data algorithms for cleaning and merging data sources and iterating through data records
      • generate generic pseudocode suitable for a variety of programming languages to communicate requirements for programmed components
      • observe different styles of presenting a technical proposal for a digital solution
      • communicate a technical proposal for a digital solution through a presentation
      • communicate using
        • digital technologies–specific language
        • language conventions, textual features such as annotations, paragraphs and sentences, and referencing conventions to convey information to particular audiences about digital solutions
        • sketches or diagrams to present information and ideas about the problem and programmed digital solutions
        • the modes of visual, written and spoken communication to present data and information about digital solutions.

       

       

      Topic 3: Innovative digital solutions

      • refine ideas for components of a prototype digital solution
      • demonstrate a prototype of a digital solution
      • generate a conceptual model of a possible solution by applying systems thinking that identifies
        • system boundaries
        • properties
        • inputs and outputs
        • user interface
        • system controls
      • generate
        • low-fidelity user-interface prototypes appropriate to the digital context by using the elements and principles of visual communication such as sketches, mood boards, storyboards, site-maps, wire-frames and mock-ups
        • algorithms as simple programs by using programming development tools
        • pseudocode to solve defined problems
        • code that creates, reads, writes, opens and closes a file (This will be API's etc)
      • generate data structures using
        • SQL statements to INSERT, UPDATE and DELETE rows in a database
        • SQL CREATE, DROP and ALTER statements
        • SQL SELECT query, including WHERE, GROUP BY, HAVING, ORDER BY, sub-selection and inner-joins clauses
      • generate program modules that
        • interact with users
        • interact with 2D data sources
        • validate data inputs (Need to look server and client side)
        • control the interactions in a digital solution (Pull down lists populated from the server)
      • communicate and clarify knowledge and understanding about the purpose of code statements using code comments
      • synthesise user interface, processing and data components to generate a prototype digital solution
      • appraise
        • the suitability of prescribed and self-determined criteria
        • the reliability, maintainability, sustainability, efficiency, effectiveness and useability of algorithms to draw conclusions and make recommendations
      • appraise and refine user interfaces by
        • testing the useability principles, including accessibility, effectiveness, safety, utility and learnability
        • observing and recording user interactions from user experience critiques
      • justify selection of relevant data from existing data sources
      • evaluate
        • user interfaces from existing solutions using heuristic reviews for the useability principles
        • by testing program modules for reliability, maintainability and efficiency using computational thinking processes such as debugging to refine a prototype digital solution
      • evaluate against prescribed and self-determined criteria the
        • user interface and programmed solutions
        • prototype digital solution.






  • Lesson 04:
      • Capturing User Feedback
        • Survey
        • I Like, I Wish, What If
        • Feedback Capture Grids
      • Making Recommendations


      • Capturing User Feedback
      • Apply recommendations through annotation



    • Course objectives
      • observable interactions - methods of documenting and collecting evidence.
      • flexible development methods to support a variety of user profiles
      • determine possible personal, social and economic impacts (through empathy maps)
      • appraise the suitability of prescribed and self-determined criteria
      • the reliability, maintainability, sustainability, efficiency, effectiveness and useability of algorithms to draw conclusions and make recommendations
      • evaluate
        • user interfaces from existing solutions using heuristic reviews for the useability principles
        • by testing program modules for reliability, maintainability and efficiency using computational thinking processes such as debugging to refine a prototype digital solution
      • evaluate against prescribed and self-determined criteria the
        • user interface and programmed solutions
        • prototype digital solution.



    • Page 56 from Digital Teacher Text Book.



    • Page 57 from Digital Teacher Text Book.



    • User Needs:
    Template: - Video Tutorial with template
      • Click to access the template below (PDF)



      • User Says
        • This section of the empathy map is used to record what the user says out loud during an individual interview, contextual inquiry, or some other form of usability study. These will be in the form of direct quotes, written verbatim.
      • User Thinks
        • This section is sometimes combined with the “Says” section and can contain the same content. However, this section will also include thoughts that the user may not vocalize, and this will have to be extrapolated from the raw data or exposed in follow-up questions after the study. Users may be uncomfortable externalizing some thoughts, whether they are questioning their own ability, feeling self-conscious, or just simply being polite.

      • User Does
        • This section is a record of the physical actions that the user makes throughout the period of research, considering how they interact both with the product and in the context of the setting.

      • User Feels
        • The “Feels” section is used to make notes on the user’s emotional state, and how they feel about the experience as they move through their tasks.

      • Pains
        • Here we can record the difficulties a user will have while they are attempting to complete their task, as well as what foreseeable problems the user may have, and reasons for them not being able to complete their task.

      • Gains
        • Finally, under “Gains” we can record how the user came to successfully complete their task, how that success is measured by the user, and how this aligns to their larger goals.






Readings / Homework

 

 

 

 

Focus Point

 

 

Information